KINDLEHILL  SCHOOL POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR POLICY

 

  1. Purpose of the Policy

1.1 This policy and procedure states the School’s position on positive behaviour in the School Community and in particular has been developed to assist  each child’s development into a balanced, responsible and self-disciplined student who is able to take their place in the school community and contribute in a positive manner to school life.

 

1.2 This Policy is framed as an affirmation of positive School Community behaviour, rather than a framing of poor student behaviour (anti-bullying).

 

  1. Application and Scope

2.1 The document aims to make clear to all teaching staff how Kindlehill School promotes a positive learning environment and where necessary, how to correct student behaviour.

2.2 We strive, within the School Community as a whole, to promote a culture of respect, cooperation and individual achievement

2.3 In addition, we have identified through our review processes, the need for students in Class 7/8 and above, to have a coherent Conduct Agreement.

 

  1. Community Behaviour Statement

Children all have a right to work, play and learn in a friendly, safe and helpful

environment.

Teachers all have a right to teach in a friendly, safe school, which is supported by the school community.

Parents all have a right to be informed, feel welcome and know their children work, play and learn in a friendly, safe school environment.

 

 

  1. Implementation

 

4.1 Kindergarten to Class 7

 

4.1.1 Between Kindergarten and Class 7 the Class Teacher works to build a

cohesive class community based on cooperation and mutual respect between child and child, and between child and teacher. Fundamental to the teacher’s practice is daily meditative work on all the children and the class as a whole. The private individual work is supported by Child Studies during Teachers’ Meetings.

4.1.2 Teachers are to treat each child with respect and courtesy and in return we expect each child to:

  • Follow a teacher’s directions
  • Enable other children to learn without distraction
  • Maintain a positive attitude
  • Respect the physical boundaries of other children.

 

 

4.1.3 Community living is based on each member fulfilling their responsibilities

towards others in order to enjoy the right to be respected themselves. Where

children are unable to meet any of these expectations the child may be asked to learn separately, remaining beside the teacher for example, for a time in order to learn to appreciate the value of community learning. Such boundary confinement will be at the discretion of the Class Teacher/Principal.

 

4.1.4 Confining the boundary of a child will be considered when he or she has over the period of a number of lessons displayed the following behaviour:

  • Failed to follow a teacher’s directions
  • Disrupted the learning of other students
  • Argued and answered back discourteously, to a teacher’s directions

 

4.1.5 Children learn in a healthy way when they complete work set by as directed by a teacher.  Completing set tasks is a vital part of building a healthy will.  From Class 1 on, a child who does not complete work during class time may be asked to remain in the classroom at recess and/or lunch until the work is finished

 

4.1.6 In cases of physical aggression of one child towards another (such as hitting, kicking, biting etc), the school will exclude the child from the classroom and the playground at the teacher’s discretion. Verbal putdowns and teasing will also attract the same response. Repeat offences may lead to the child being asked to stay at home for part of or a full day (suspension). Continuing offences may lead to a review of the child’s position in the school.

 

4.1.7 Serious instances of behaviour between children will be dealt with using the principles of  Restorative Justice applied appropriately considering the age of the children involved. Restorative Justice requires the Teacher/School to find a balance between the following:

  • The therapeutic and the retributive models of justice
  • The rights of offenders and the needs of victims
  • The need to rehabilitate offenders and the duty to protect the public.

 

4.1.8 Ongoing behaviours which impact on the safe and cooperative learning environment of the class will be dealt with on a child by child basis through the development of a behaviour management plan. This is designed, implemented and monitored by the principal and class teacher. Children with disruptive behaviours are guided and supported to learn appropriate means of interaction in their school life.  Teaching positive behaviours, strategies for self regulation as well as consequence for breaches of the behaviour code are part of a behaviour management plan.

.

 

4.1.8  Discipline and Disability:

The fact that a student has a disability doesn’t excuse them from the school’s discipline regime.  Action taken in respect of a child with a disability may sometimes be “protective” (for that child or others) rather than disciplinary; for example:

If the student is behaving

  •  In an anti social manner
  • In a disruptive manner
  • In a way that is a danger to self or other

 

The teacher must strike a balance between a need to assist the student, the educational needs of other students and the safety of other students.

Relevant considerations for the teacher:

  • What action would I take if the student did not have a disability?
  • What adjustments should I make if any?

 

The teachers work out of an understanding that sameness and fairness are not equal. The age, specific needs and capacities of each child are taken into account in responding to behaviour that is disruptive or inappropriate. The teacher will respond out of the principle of fairness to behaviours and this does not always mean the same consequence is applied to every child for a similar behaviour.

 

  1. IMPLEMENTATION in HIGH SCHOOL

4.2 Classes 7  to 1O

 

4.2.1 The same core values apply throughout the school but we need a different implementation approach to meet the needs of High School students. This approach relies on a Responsibilities and Rights Agreement outlining the responsibilities and rights of members of the student community and a clear Agreement defining the conditions with which the school expects each student to comply. Just as in the early years, there are age appropriate consequences for breaches of the agreement. The appropriate behaviours for a safe and supportive learning environment are actively taught and discussed with each class and once taught they are to be adhered to without the need for any further warnings to be given.

 

4.2.2  Discipline and Disability:

The fact that a student has a disability doesn’t excuse them from the school’s discipline regime.  Action taken in respect of a child with a disability may sometimes be “protective” (for that child or others) rather than disciplinary; for example:

If the student is behaving

  •  In an anti social manner
  • In a disruptive manner
  • In a way that is a danger to self or other

 

The teacher must strike a balance between a need to assist the student, the educational needs of other students and the safety of other students.

Relevant considerations for the teacher:

  • What action would I take if the student did not have a disability?
  • What adjustments should I make if any?

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Responsibilities and Rights

 

5.1 Students have a responsibility:

To treat others with understanding and empathy; not to laugh at others, tease

others or hurt the feelings of others.

 

To treat all other students, teachers and non-teaching staff, school community and the general public politely and with respect. Students have the responsibility to respect the position of teachers and respond to their directions  courteously.

 

To help others feel safe at school by not threatening, hurting or harming anyone in any way, and by not acting in potentially dangerous ways; and by accepting the consequences that may arise from actions.

 

Not to steal, damage or destroy the property of other students and excursion

venues, and to protect and to care for our school equipment and grounds.

 

To attend classes on time and be prepared to learn, with work up to date and homework completed.

 

To contribute to a respectful learning environment and ensure that their behaviour does not interfere with other students’ right to learn.

 

To support the Smoking, Drug and Alcohol Protocol, that prohibits use of these on school grounds or on out of grounds school activities.

 

To care for the school grounds, buildings and equipment: to keep them clean, safe and well presented.

 

To dress in accordance with the school dress code.

 

To behave safely and responsibly when travelling to and from school.

 

To limit the use of electronic devices such as mobile phones in accordance with school policy, which is that they may only be used on school grounds with the explicit permission of a teacher.

 

 

5.2 Students have the Right:

To be treated with understanding, empathy and equality, free from pre-conceived notions.

 

To be listened to and treated with respect and politeness

 

To be safe and to feel secure at school, knowing that their rights and

responsibilities will be maintained.

 

To expect their property to be safe.

 

To work in a positive work environment that promotes learning and recognises

achievement.

 

To expect that their school have an excellent reputation in the community.

 

 

 

 


 

  1. Playground Behaviour

 

 

 

Follow duty teacher’s instructions

 

No ball games outside of designated areas

 

Out of bounds to be adhered to– ask teacher’s permission

to retrieve balls, etc

 

Wear appropriate sun protection according to school protocol.

 

Tackling and branding games not permitted

 

Sticks  not to be used as weapons.  No running with sticks

 

Observe quiet areas: steps, decking and veranda

 

Eat in appropriate areas and tidy up after yourself.

 

No climbing on top of fences and the very top of equipment

 

No rock throwing, spitting, offensive or potentially dangerous actions.

 

No use of electronic devices except in accordance with school protocol.

 


 

 

  1. The High School Student Agreement

 

As a member of the school community at Kindlehill School, I have the right to be treated with respect and dignity by all other students, teachers, staff and parents, both within and outside of the classroom. This right I also extend at all times to all other students, teachers, staff, parents and visitors. These rights extend to names, personal property, classrooms, school resources, litter and our natural environment including fauna and flora, and school animals.

 

I also have the right to regular supervision, guidance from all teachers but in particular from my class coordinator, in all matters relating to the furthering of my education.

 

I  value the learning environment at Kindlehill and will endeavour to strive towards my potential in all subjects. This includes punctuality, being properly equipped and in a receptive mood – free from the negative side effects of chemical substances or other inappropriate influences – to allow lessons to be taught in harmony and respectfulness.

 

I understand that disruptive behaviour by an individual or group is to deny everyone else in the class the right to an educational experience, and that this behaviour is totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated.

 

I understand that whilst the school is supportive of individual freedom, it may need to regulate student self-expression – art, clothing, etc – according to its educational philosophy and beliefs.

 

I accept that illicit substances and material are not permitted at Kindlehill.  I support that Kindlehill School is a non-smoking zone, which extends to all excursions and class trips.

 

In the resolution of any dispute of which I am involved, I understand that I have the right to be heard and that the school will consider my view before any decision is reached.

 

I understand that any involvement in bullying, smoking, alcohol, illegal

substances and or disregard for these guidelines may result in disciplinary measures, such as apologies, school service, suspension or expulsion, and that the school may have a subsequent responsibility to inform relevant authorities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Discipline Procedures for breaches of the High School Agreement

 

 

8.1 There are a  number of possible consequences which will be encountered by students breaking the Conduct Agreement. These consequences will be applied by the school at its discretion and as appropriate. It is very important that parents support the application of these consequences and explain to their student why they have come about. The possible consequences are as follows:

 

8.1.1 Meet With Teacher/s. At this meeting the teacher/s will bring the impact of the student’s behaviour to the student’s attention and seek assurances that they will endeavour to improve. Consequences of student behaviours must be met.

 

8.1.2 Confiscation. Any electronic equipment not in use as part of a lesson may be confiscated. This also applies to school events held outside normal school hours. All confiscated equipment is held in a secure location until the time at which it may be returned to the student.

 

8.1.3 Restorative Justice Process. When the infringement involves hurting others through actions or words or the damage of property a restorative justice process may be followed. This will involve an opportunity for the student responsible to make appropriate reparation to the injured party.

 

Restorative justice is about restoring what has been taken away and is a beneficial process for both the students responsible and those who have been hurt by their actions. It involves more than a spoken apology and will be particular to the damage that has been done.

 

8.1.4 Student Plan and Conduct Book. Students who fall into a persistent habit of unacceptable behaviour may be put on to an individual student plan and/or  Individual Conduct Review. This Conduct Review is is used to monitor student behaviour, identify ongoing issues as well as improvements,  and can also be used to support the student in goal setting and reflective practices in regard to their own conduct.  The high school coordinator overseas this. (see conduct review p 10)

 

8.1.5 Parent Interview. If the School feels that an inappropriate pattern of behaviour is developing for a particular student or if a serious infringement occurs parents may be asked to attend an interview with members of the Student Conduct group and/or representatives of the College of Teachers.  At this interview the teachers will seek to work with the parents to arrive at measures to improve the student’s behaviour.

 

8.1.6 Suspension. For serious offences a suspension may be given. In most cases these will take place at school. The student will be excluded from regular classes but will be permitted to work quietly in a supervised ‘time-out’ room or will be sent home if safe and appropriate to do so. The duration of the suspension will be determined by the school and communicated to the parents of the student. School service may also be incorporated into the suspension.

 

8.1.7 Expulsion. Sometimes despite our best efforts it is not possible to continue with the enrolment of a student.

 

8.2 Parents are welcome to approach the students High School Coordinator if they have questions about the application of a consequence for their student.

 

 

 

  1. Procedural Fairness

 

9..1 Procedural fairness is a basic right of all when dealing with authorities in matters of conflict. It will be adhered to where investigations into a student’s conduct is required.

Procedural fairness refers to what is sometimes described as the ‘hearing rule’ and the ‘right to an unbiased decision’. The ‘hearing rule’ includes the right of the person to:

  • Know details of any allegation including any other information that may

be taken into account in considering the matter

  • Know the process by which the matter will be considered
  • Respond to the allegations
  • Know how to seek a review of the decision made in response to the

allegations.

  • An unbiased decision – implying: Impartiality in the investigation and decision-making, and an absence of bias by a decision-maker

 

 

  1. High School Classroom Behaviour Management Plan

.

This is to be applied by all teachers of high school (see attached p 9)

 

  1. Individual Student Plans for Students with Special Needs

 

These will be implemented as required.

 

 

  1. Bullying- high school

 

Bullying is behaviour not tolerated by Kindlehill.  We believe students have a right to be safe and happy at school.

 

We recognise that bullying can happen anywhere: at school, in sporting teams, between neighbours, in social media. Bullying can take on various forms including giving nasty looks, making rude gestures, calling names, being rude and impolite, spreading stories and rumours and teasing.

 

This behaviour may also include:

keeping someone out of a group

acting in an unpleasant way near someone

‘mucking about’ that goes too far

harassment or any form of discrimination based on disability, gender, race or religion.

 

Hurting someone physically is a form of bullying.

 

 

Kindlehill deals pro-actively to prevent bullying in the school through the diligent maintaining of the school ethos of collaboration and respect in the school community. (see also, A Safe and Supportive School Policy).

 

Should bullying  occur, teachers would promptly apply the necessary strategies including  mediation, disciplinary action, warnings, social skills programs, recommendations for counselling, parental involvement and the principles of restorative justice.

 

Importantly, students engage in maintaining a respectful and collaborative school environment through  their actions and attitudes.  They are taught skills to promote a safe environment for all such as active listening, empathy, assertiveness, peer mentoring, identifying power abuse in relationships, cooperating in maintaining clear boundaries, dealing with risk and decision making.  They are also made aware of the consequences of bullying for the individual and for our society as a whole, through research and discussion. This typically occurs in a personal development setting but not exclusively.   The teachers work collaboratively to observe, to apply strategies to deal with incidences that might lead to or constitute bullying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policy review 01/03/16

CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT PLAN YEAR HIGH SCHOOL

 

 

 

For the following behaviours:

(1 or 2 warnings, then a student is sent to the office (to Lynn)

  • Answering back
  • Not listening
  • Not getting on with the task

 

 

For these behaviours:

(Immediate exclusion from class – sent to the office (to Lynn)

  • Physical pushing, poking, shoving
  • Swearing
  • Refusal to accept direction/instruction
  • Violent/aggressive/sexualised talk
  • Potentially dangerous actions

 

 

 

*should a student refuse to leave the class; the teacher should a) send another student to inform Lynn

  1. b) in the event of a serious threat, leave with the other students and come to the office for the incident to be dealt with by Lynn

 

 

 

 

CONDUCT REVIEW CARD

Satisfactory Improving Needs improvement
 

Week ____   Subject:______________________________

  • Organised for class (pen, notebook, text)
  • Punctual
  • Contributes to a focussed and cooperative learning environment
  • Courteous to other students
  • Courteous to teacher
  • Work in class

 

Teacher comment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONDUCT REVIEW CARD

Satisfactory Improving Needs improvement
 

Week ____   Subject:______________________________

  • Organised for class (pen, notebook, text)
  • Punctual
  • Contributes to a focussed and cooperative learning environment
  • Courteous to other students
  • Courteous to teacher
  • Work in class

 

Teacher comment: